Lower Eyelid Twitching, Left, Right, Bottom, Meaning, Superstition, How to Stop

An eyelid twitch, or blepharospasm, is a repetitive, involuntary spasm of the eyelid muscles. A twitch usually occurs in the upper lid, but it can occur in both the upper and lower lids. For most people, these spasms are very mild and feel like a gentle tug on the eyelid. Others may experience a spasm strong enough that it forces you to close your eyelid completely.

Lower Eyelid Twitching

What causes eyelid twitching

Lower eyelid twitching

Lower eyelid twitching typically occurs every few seconds for a minute or two. Episodes of eyelid twitching are unpredictable. The twitch may occur off and on for several days. Then, you may not experience any twitching for weeks or even months.

The twitches are painless and harmless, but they may bother you. Most spasms will resolve on their own without the need for treatment. In rare cases, eyelid spasms may be an early warning sign of a chronic movement disorder, especially if the spasms are accompanied by other facial twitches or uncontrollable movements.

Lower Eyelid Twitch Causes

Stress

While we’re all under stress at times, our bodies react in different ways. A twitching eye can be one sign of stress, especially when it is related to vision problems such as eye strain. Yoga, breathing exercises, spending time with friends or pets and getting more down time into your schedule are among the many ways to reduce stress that may be causing the twitch.

Tiredness

A lack of sleep, whether because of stress or some other reason, can trigger a twitching eyelid. Catching up on your sleep can help.

Eye strain

Vision-related stress can occur if, for instance, you need glasses or a change of glasses. Even minor vision problems can make your eyes work too hard, triggering eyelid twitching. Schedule an eye exam and have your vision checked and your eyeglass prescription. Computer eye strain from overuse of computers, tablets and smartphones also is a common cause of eyelid twitching. You may have breaks from your computer after every 20 minutes. This reduces eye muscle fatigue that may trigger eyelid twitching.

If you spend a lot of time on the computer, you might want to talk to your eye doctor about special computer glasses.

Caffeine: Too much caffeine can trigger lower eyelid twitching. Try cutting back on coffee, tea, chocolate and soft drinks (or switch to decaffeinated versions) for a week or two and see if your eye twitching disappears.

Alcohol: Try abstaining for a while, since alcohol also can cause eyelids to twitch.

Dry eyes

Many adults experience dry eyes, especially after age 50. Dry eyes are also very common among people who use computers, take certain medications, wear contact lenses and consume caffeine and/or alcohol. If you are tired with stress, this two can increase your risk of dry eyes.

If you have a lower eyelid twitching and your eyes feel gritty or dry, see your eye doctor for a dry eye evaluation. Restoring moisture to the surface of your eye may stop the spasm and decrease the risk of twitching in the future.

Nutritional imbalances

Some reports suggest a lack of certain nutritional substances, such as magnesium, can trigger eyelid spasms. Although these reports are not conclusive, I can’t rule this out as a possible cause of a twitching eye. If you are concerned that your diet may not be supplying all the nutrients you need, I suggest talking this over with your family doctor for expert advice rather than randomly buying over-the-counter nutritional products.

Allergies

People with eye allergies can have itching, swelling and watery eyes. When eyes are rubbed, this releases histamine into the lid tissues and the tears. This is significant, because some evidence indicates that histamine can cause eyelid twitching.

To offset this problem, some eye doctors have recommended antihistamine eye drops or tablets to help some eyelid twitches. But remember that antihistamines also can cause dry eyes. It’s best to work with your eye doctor to make sure you’re doing the right thing for your eyes.

If the spasms become chronic, you may have what’s known as “benign essential blepharospasm,” which is the name for chronic and uncontrollable eyelid movement. This condition typically affects both eyes. The exact cause of the condition is unknown, but the following may make spasms worse:

Benign essential blepharospasm is more common in women than in men. According to research finding, it affects approximately 50,000 Americans and usually develops in middle to late adulthood. The condition will likely worsen over time, and it may eventually cause blurry vision, increased sensitivity to light, and facial spasms.

Complications of lower eyelid twitching

Very rarely, eyelid spasms are a symptom of a more serious brain or nerve disorder. When the eyelid twitches are a result of these more serious conditions, they are almost always accompanied by other symptoms. Brain and nerve disorders that may cause eyelid twitches include:

  • Bell’s palsy (facial palsy), which is a condition that causes one side of your face to droop downward
  • dystonia, which causes unexpected muscle spasms and the affected area’s body part to twist or contort
  • cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis), which causes the neck to randomly spasm and the head to twist into uncomfortable positions
  • multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a disease of the central nervous system that causes cognitive and movement problems, as well as fatigue
  • Parkinson’s disease, which can cause trembling limbs, muscle stiffness, balance problems, and difficulty speaking
  • Tourette’s syndrome, which is characterized by involuntary movement and verbal tics

Undiagnosed corneal scratches can also cause chronic eyelid twitches. If you think you have an eye injury, see your optometrist immediately. Corneal scratches can cause permanent eye damage.

Lower Eyelid Twitching Meaning

The advent of technology has brought about much change in our everyday lives. However, some things still stay the same. Superstitions are one of them. Of all the numerous superstitions, the twitching of the right eye remains quite popular.

Right lower Eyelid Twitching Superstition

Right lower eyelid twitching

Eyelid twitching superstition

Culture has a significant role to play in superstitions. The belief system of your culture decides whether the twitching of the right eye is a positive or a negative sign. Certain cultures believe that this is a sign of Lady Luck paying you a visit, and will expect a favorable turn of events. On the other hand, other cultures shudder at the thought of the right eye twitching and anticipate negative events.

Chinese

The Chinese apply the concept of Yin and Yang to the right eye twitching superstition. According to ancient Chinese sayings, it indicates bad luck for a man and good fortune for a woman. It doesn’t stop here. The superstitions vary based on which part of the eye is twitching. Twitching of the lower eyelid might bring positivity, while a twitching eyelid is a sign that you are the subject of gossip. Another interesting and unique concept drawn from the Chinese Almanac is that twitching of the eyes can mean different things in different time of the day

Indian

Their superstitious interpretation of the right eye twitching is similar to that of the Chinese. The Indian belief also differentiates between men and women. However, unlike the Chinese system, it is believed that twitching of the right eye will bring benefits for a man and twitching of the left eye for a woman won’t leave her without added benefits.

African

The African interpretation of the right eye twitching superstition is much more deeply rooted in science as compared to the Chinese and Indian beliefs. They believe that twitching of the lower eyelid is indicative of the person shedding tears and that the twitching of the upper eyelid is indicative of meeting an unexpected person.

Lower Eyelid Twitching Superstition

Although the left eye twitching bad luck or good luck superstitions might make for a good reading, there is a scientific reason behind left eye twitching. Involuntary eye twitching also referred to as eye muscle spasm can be attributed to an eye problem known as blepharospasm. The condition is actually caused by uncontrollable contractions of the muscles around the eyelids.

This chronic, uncontrollable blinking of the eyes is the result of dry eyes, conjunctivitis or light sensitivity. In addition to this there is many brain or neurological disorders like epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Tourette syndrome or certain eye allergies and injuries. Read on to know more about eye twitching – What does it mean.

Lower eyelid twitching can also be caused by certain conditions such as stress, air pollution, strained eyes or fatigue. If it is an extreme condition you need to consult a doctor who might prescribe oral medications or certain eye drops. In an extreme case, myectomy or surgery for treating blinking eyes may have to be performed to cure the excessive twitching of the eyes.

However, general twitching in the eyes can be cured with plenty of rest and cutting down on certain things like smoking, caffeine or alcohol. To know more about how to cure eye twitches read more on eye twitch remedies. So the next time your left eye twitches and you worry about a catastrophe befalling you, just stay calm and hope for the best.

In China, a twitching right eye for men signifies good luck, or maybe a major windfall. For us females, we’re not so lucky. A twitching left eye signifies good luck while a twitching right one is a strict no!

There is even a superstition based on an anatomical break down of the eye. If it is the lower eyelid that’s twitching, it means good fortune is headed your way. There’s yet another one that claims a twitching eyelid means someone is gossiping about you.

Next to the Chinese, the Indians are the Olympic champions when it comes to superstitions. The commonly believed one here is just the opposite of the Chinese version. Here a twitching left eye is definitely a good omen, while a twitching right one is considered inauspicious.

The Nigerians go with the Chinese version. Left eye – bad, Right eye – Good.

Eyelid twitching causes

Eyelid twitching meaning

Now with this next one, you’ll be pleased it’s your right eye and not your left eye. It’s not clear where this one comes from, but according to it a twitching left eye means there’s soon going to be a death in the family. A twitching right one on the other hand means an impending birth.

To the Hawaiians, an eye twitch can either mean the arrival of a stranger, or that you’re soon going to mourn for someone.

In Cameroon and some other parts of Africa, a lower eyelid twitching means you will soon shed tears. As far as superstitions go, this one is quite scientific. Tears normally flow from the corner of the lower eyelid. Still on Africa, when the upper eyelid twitches, it’s a sure sign you’re going to meet someone you didn’t expect to see. This one’s also connected to anatomical science, it seems. Surprise and amazement are normally expressed in humans by the raising of the upper eyelids.

Right Bottom Eyelid Twitching

Millions of people suffer from eye twitching – in some it may be intermittent, brought on by a sudden increase of stress or sleeplessness. In others, it’s more pronounced and can interfere with day to day life. Regardless of which category a person falls into, there’s a goldmine of superstitions that revolve around eye twitching. Each culture seems to have its own take on the deeper significance of eye twitching.

In China for instance, where superstitions and myths frequently cross over into modern living, the chief superstition seems to be that a twitch in the right bottom eyelid twitching signifies good luck, maybe a major windfall. The entire situation seems to turn around in the case of females; for them, a twitching left eye signifies good luck while a twitching right one is a strict no! Even among the Chinese, there seem to be as many superstitions regarding eye twitching as the sufferers themselves.

There is even a superstition based on an anatomical break down of the eye. A twitch in the lower left eyelid means you can expect to cry soon while a corresponding one in the right eyelid means good fortune is headed your way. There’s yet another one that claims a twitching eyelid means someone is gossiping about you. We think this is a pretty cool one – always good to know the exact moment when your enemies are bad mouthing you.

In any case, all these mental calisthenics figuring out whether an eye twitch means you’re going to win the lottery or have the sky fall on your head, will probably give you enough stress to trigger off a whole new series of lower eyelid twitching.

Next to the Chinese, the Indians are the Olympic champions when it comes to superstitions. The commonly believed one here is just the opposite of the Chinese version. Here a twitching left eye is definitely a good omen, while a twitching right one is considered inauspicious.

Another superstition is a little more frightening than the above. It’s not clear where this one comes from, but according to it a twitching left eye means there’s soon going to be a death in the family. A twitching right one on the other hand means an impending birth.

To the Hawaiians, an eye twitch can either mean the arrival of a stranger, or that you’re soon going to mourn for someone.

Muscle spasms also happen on the eyelids and you can feel sudden movement of the eyelid muscle by yourself. The involuntary contraction of eyelids muscles occurs mostly to many individual and it is a common problem. The condition is irritating and it might be a serious health issue. Twitching of the eyelids can be attributed to an eye disorder known as blepharospasm.

Other neurological disorder can be related to involuntary blinking of the eye such as epilepsy, Tourette syndrome, Parkinson’s disease. Injuries on facial area can also cause involuntary eyelid blinking. Facial spasms on the eyelid can develop into inflammation and these calls for medical consultation. For these case medical checkup should be done to ensure the problem is done off.

Left Lower Eyelid Twitching

Muscle spasms also happen on the eyelids and you can feel sudden movement of the eyelid muscle by yourself. The involuntary contraction of eyelids muscles occurs mostly to many individual and it is a common problem. The condition is irritating and it might be a serious health issue. Twitching of the eyelids can be attributed to an eye disorder known as blepharospasm.

Left lower eyelid twitching could be the result of the dry eyes, conjunctivitis or due to light sensitivity. Other neurological disorder can be related to involuntary blinking of the eye such as epilepsy, Tourette syndrome, Parkinson’s disease. Injuries on facial area can also cause involuntary eyelid blinking. Facial spasms on the eyelid can develop into inflammation and these calls for medical consultation. For these case medical checkup should be done to ensure the problem is done off.

How to Stop Lower Eyelid Twitching

According to your culture, twitching of the left eye could have positive superstition. But the fact is that you need to get medical consultation if you experience facial spasms because it could be a symptom of neurological disorder like Parkinson’s disease that requires medical attention.

If you experience extreme left facial spasms that occurs for more than three consecutive days. You need to seek for medical advice. Rare cases of left spasms as symptom of Parkinson’s disease have been reported to health records. Left eye twitching could be due to other infections or allergies that need special medication. It is advisable to get doctor’s prescribed medication to relieve facial spasms. You will be give antihistamine and eye drops that will help to relieve the problem of eye twitching.

Home Remedies for Eye Twitching

If eye twitching is bothering you and it is becoming a health issue, no reason to panic when you can have the following tips to get rid of these problems at home.

Have enough time to sleep

It is advisable to sleep more than seven hours each day because the recommended time to sleep per day is between seven to eight hours. When you sleep less than this duration it can result to health problems. Lack of sufficient sleep greatly affects the eyes, to avoid the twitch of the right eye, go in your bed on time and relax to a deep slumber of about eight hours each day.

Maintain your eye well-lubricated

Having dry eyes contribute to lower eyelid twitching. Fortunately the issue of dry eyes can be solved at home. Take lukewarm water on a basin and mix it with two table spoonful of honey and clean your face. Wipe it using washcloth. The honey in the water has a soothing effect on the eye and it will keep it well moist. The honey also reduces irritation of the eye and keeps it well lubricated.

Sooth your eyes

When your eyes are stressed by action of watching television or movie in computer for long time, it can cause spasms in your eyes. To relieve these faster at home, take cold water on a basin and cold compress your eyes using washcloth. The eye muscles will relax.

Use milk drops

Eyelid twitching home remedies

Using milk drops to get rid of eye twitching

When your eyes are affected by allergies, smoke, pollution, dust particle and other chemicals like detergents, it is advisable to use cold milk by placing few drops in the affected eye. The milk has soothing effect that relieves irritation and twitching of the eye. Milk also lubricates your eye by moistening it.

Take a balance diet

Your diet at home will help you to escape problem of muscle spasms in the facial part. Ensure you consume food rich in vitamin, B12 and magnesium mineral. Green vegetables are good for magnesium, supplement your diet with vitaminB12 and bask on the sun every morning replenish vitamin.

More references

  1. Eyelid twitch: http://www.healthline.com/health/eyelid-twitch?m=2#overview1
  2. Lower eyelid twitching: http://www.steadyhealth.com/topics/lower-eyelid-twitching
  3. Eye twitching and eyelid twitches: http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/eye-twitching.htm
  4. Right eye twitching superstition: http://www.newhealthadvisor.com/Right-Eye-Twitching-Superstition.html
  5. Eye twitch causes and how to make it stop: http://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/eye-twitch-what-causes-it-and-how-make-it-stop
  6. How to stop eye twitching: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Eye-Twitching

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